Parenting Your Wealth

Repurposed from the recent CCM Spring Newsletter.

In the face of political drama at home and abroad, it’s certainly been a winter for trying our patience, hasn’t it? For anyone who has ever been a parent or a child – that is, for everyone – there are several comparisons we can draw between good parenting and good wealth management. For both, plenty of patience is one of the most important qualities to embrace.

As an investor, you probably have plenty of “those days” when you wonder whether your money is ever going to grow up. It doesn’t do as you hoped for. It misbehaves. It runs with the wrong crowd. It ignores your best efforts to protect it from harm. But then there are those other days. Suddenly, your money hits a growth spurt, exceeding all expectations! It’s then that you realize that many of the greatest challenges you and your investments faced along the way are the same ones that are contributing to its strength and shaping its character over time.

As much as we would prefer our wealth to mature in a calm, orderly way, there is solid evidence to demonstrate that returns are far more likely to occur in these sorts of anxiety-generating fits and starts. For example, you may recall that January 2016 was an unsettling time in the market, with particularly petulant returns. Some pundits blamed China and oil. There was no incredibly obvious reason; it was just in one of those moods. On the flip side, in the wake of the June 23, 2016 Brexit referendum, when we might have expected the market to remain in a funk for a while, it took a dive but then mostly continued upward, especially in the U.S., where stock market indexes experienced a number of record highs in July.

The Center for Research in Security Prices (CRSP) index returns by year show that from 1926 – 2016, the market experienced 68 years of positive returns (75%) and 23 years of negative returns (25%). The graph above shows a visual of what this looks like. Therefore, although the occurrence and degree of corrections and bear markets might make an investor uncomfortable, long term returns continue to demonstrate that patience and discipline are the best responses to market turmoil.

Most investors are wise to offset the heated risks involved in pursuing higher expected returns with an appropriate helping of “cooler” holdings. We also suggest employing global diversification to manage the market risks that you do take on. Spreading your risks among multiple kinds of holdings around the world can be compared to raising several children, without choosing a favorite. Each is expected to contribute in its own special way.

With investing you should avoid the temptation to jump in and out of uncertain markets. We know they are going to often misbehave and sometimes disappoint. We even know that they may never deliver as hoped for. But once you have done everything you can to position your portfolio for the outcome you have in mind, you’ve also done everything you can to stack the odds of success in your favor. The rest is where that patience comes in.

2018-04-24T13:11:37+00:00